• Whenever anyone enters your house they pose a risk of bringing the virus with them.

  • If your domestic worker does not live onsite then they will be travelling on public transport and they would have come into close contact with other people

  • It is vital that you educate your domestic workers no how they can protect themselves from the virus, it might be an idea to provide them with surgical masks, gloves and soap or hand sanitise. Make sure you explain to them when and why they should use these different protective gears

  • It might be an idea to get them to shower and change their clothes upon arrival at your home.

  • If you have someone who is perceived to be vulnerable (over the age of 60, or have health complications such as asthma or cancer) then if might be an idea to ask your domestic worker to go on leave for the next few weeks. We would like to encourage you to keep paying your domestic employees, as this will allow them to practice social distancing and they won’t have to take public transport to go to another job

  • If your domestic worker resides on your property then it is vital that you educate them about the current situation as much as possible.

  • They will also need to restrict visitors and they will need to avoid any nonessential trips on public transport and they will need to avoid going to other people’s houses and bars.

  • A tough decision may need to be made, as you may need to ask them to remain on your property over the next couple of weeks, and if they decide to go home then you will need to decide if they are putting your family at risk by them returning to your home. Give them the options and give them as much information as possible so they can make an informed decision.